Ice Cream and Zombies

Do you remember the first time that you ate ice-cream as a child? Or the first time you jumped into the sea?

First time experiences are very nice, but also become rarer and rarer as we grow up.This is why traveling is loved by so many people: All these new first times!

First time to fly to China, first time to eat something new, first time to do, see, hear or breathe all these new things!

Oh, and the first ever flight delay in China!

Imagine this: you have been traveling for countless hours and as a result you are pretty much a zombie, you have reached an airport that you visit for the first time, only to discover that your mobile line – which was supposed to work internationally and had previously worked internationally – is not working, the free wifi of the airport needs – of course – a working mobile line to give you an access code to the wifi network, you have tried to make a call from an airport land line and failed miserably, and your connecting flight to Xi’an is delayed over and over again.

I need to contact Cairene to let her know about the delay. You see: I will reach Xi’an airport late, buses might not be available anymore, so Cairene arranged a driver to wait for me. But since I got delayed so many times, I have no idea if the driver will be waiting or not, no idea of anything else, really, because – basically – I am off grid.

So, I wait, and wait, and wait, take videos, make funny faces at some Chinese toddler, take a video of myself and the situation – just in case they found it later with my belongings and my skeleton in abandoned corner in the airport many years from now – and then wait some more, until eventually – right before my feet get stuck forever to the floor of the airport – the line starts to move, and I find myself sitting in another airplane full of Chinese people flying to Xi’an.

2 hours and 2 coffees later, I find myself in Xi’an airport, with Carine at the exit door with a big smile on her face.(I secretly cried tears of happiness on the inside. Shhh, no one tell her that! I will not become a broke, homeless foreigner, living in front of the exit door of Xi’an airport! Yay!)

And this is how I reached Xi’an city, where Carine and I were to spend the next few days walking around the city, fighting the endless rain and finishing the health check papers.

written by Rora


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Books about China

While searching for books about China, by Chinese authors, and regarding Chinese issues, I came across several lists of recommended books. These, in no particular order, are the books I was most intrigued by and will try to read in the future.

Factory Girls by Leslie Chang (2008)

China in 10 Words by Yu Hua (2011)

Mao’s Great Famine by Frank Dikötter (2010)

China’s Second Continent by Howard French (2014)

Wild Grass: Three Stories of Change in Modern China by Ian Johnson (2004)

The Corpse Walker by Liao Yiwu (2008)

Dream of Ding Village by Yan Lianke (2006)

Bitter Winds: A Memoir of My Years in China’s Gulag by Harry Wu (1994)

The Tiananmen Papers by Andrew J. Nathan (2001)

The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang (1997)

Understanding China by John Bryan Starr (1957)

A Thousand Years of Good Prayers by Yiyun Li (2006)

Oracle Bones by Peter Hessler (2006)

Midnight in Peking by Paul French (2011)

China Candid: The People on the People’s Republic by Sang Ye (2005)

Fortress Besieged by Qian Zhongshu (1947)

Monkey by Wu Cheng’en, translated by Arthur Waley (1942)

The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck (1931)

Big Breasts and Wide Hips by Mo Yan (1996)

Soul Mountain by Gao Xingjian (1990)

The Plum in the Golden Vase by anonymous (1610)

Wang in Love and Bondage by Xiaobo Wang (2007)

Tiananmen Moon: Inside the Chinese Student Uprising of 1989 by Philip Cunningham (2009)

The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham (1925)

Sources:

Scott Cendrowski at fortune.com

Zhengyi Mei Mei at listverse.com

Annie Wu at chinahighlights.com

Alec Ash, Tom Pellman, and Anthony Tao at theanthill.org

Paul Mason at theguardian.com


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