Newcomer

My husband Rora arrived in China on June 2. It is only his second time to be out of Egypt, and while the first time was only a short vacation in Germany, he has now moved to China for good. This interview was conducted by me, Cairene, on the evening of June 8, less than a week after his arrival.

Cairene: “Hi Rora, after a few days in China, what are your first impressions?”

Rora: “My first impressions? Well, I was expecting a big culture shock, and the shock for me was that there was no culture shock. I feel that I simply moved from one area of Cairo to another area of Cairo somehow. Not that Hanzhong is like Cairo in any way, it is much greener, and much nicer than Cairo, but the general atmosphere, in my opinion, is not that far from what I’m used to.”

Cairene: “What would you say are the biggest differences?”

Rora: “The biggest differences are that there are Chinese characters everywhere and that I don’t understand them, which is nice, because now I don’t have to take care of so many things anymore.”

Cairene: “And what would you say are the biggest similarities?”

Rora: “Today we were walking in the street with some friend of yours…”

Cairene: “I didn’t know the person! …. Now she’s a friend!”

Rora: “… and I realized that we are walking in the middle of the street…”

Cairene: “Instead of the sidewalk…”

Rora: “Exactly. Because this is China, and it’s more like Cairo in this regard. If this were Berlin or some other European city we would have been walking on the sidewalk.”

Cairene: “What is the most difficult thing for you here?”

Rora: “The crappy internet. Ah, and the chopsticks. I’m still learning to eat with them. It’s difficult, but if I don’t want to starve I will learn it eventually.”

Cairene: “What do you think about the people?”

Rora: “Well, there are two kinds of Chinese I have met until now. The one kind are in big cities like Xi’an where people are basically ignoring you, and might even bump into you sometimes – this seems to be the same in every big city in the world, though. And the other kind are people from a smaller city like the one we are in now and they are more curious about you, they smile at you and they are more relaxed and nicer.”

Cairene: “And they might even start a random conversation with you in the street like the lady today. How do you like the food?”

Rora: “It’s Chinese food. It’s delicious! I like it a lot. Even the spicy stuff. Well, until now I haven’t eaten anything really spicy, but I like it!”

Cairene: “What do you miss most about Egypt?”

Rora: “My family of course, but so far nothing else really.”

Cairene: “Is there anything else that you want to say to our readers?”

Rora: ”Next time you come to China make sure that your roaming and internet service are actually working, because if not you might get lost in a big big country.”

Cairene: “That’s coming from an IT guy.”

Rora: “Exactly.”

Cairene: “From an IT who didn’t make sure that it’s working before he left… Hehe… One last question: what is the weirdest thing you’ve seen so far?”

Rora: “Little kids peeing and shitting in the streets. That’s nasty!”


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Settling: City

China, also known as the People’s Republic of China, consists of 31 provincial-level devisions, among them the province of Shaanxi. While Shaanxi is commonly regarded as a Northwestern province, it is located more or less exactly in China’s center. And if I had to name China’s most central city, I would name Hanzhong 汉中, which translates to “middle of the Han River”.

Hanzhong has been my home for a bit over two months now, and I very much enjoy living here, as the quality of life is high, the air, compared to many other Chinese cities, very clean, the city very green, and the food great! Hanzhong is located in a basin, surrounded on all sides by mountain ranges: the Daba Mountains in the south, and the Qin Mountains in the north. The Han River and several tributaries flow through Hanzhong, which offer splendid opportunities for walks and bike rides along the river banks.

To be exact, Hanzhong is a prefecture-level city, which is further divided into ten counties and one district. As I live south of the Han River, I live in Nanzheng County, and the more densely populated urban area north of the river is called Hantai District. Wherever you look, Hanzhong is rapidly modernizing, and high rise apartment buildings are shooting from the ground like the mushrooms in Sylvia Plath’s poetic forest floor. Some older living quarters can still be found throughout the city, but I am sure they, too, will soon be flattened to make space for modern apartments.

At the moment Hanzhong can be reached by long-distance buses, slow trains, and a few air links. Traveling to Shaanxi’s provincial capital, Xi’an, currently takes around four hours by bus – a very scenic route as long as one is in the basin; once one reaches the mountains one tunnel follows the next. I have, however, heard talk about a high-speed rail connection, said to commence operations in autumn, which will connect Hanzhong with the rest of the country.

To get from one part of the city to another countless city buses operate all day – though I must say that 8:30 pm is really not a good time to finish operations. If one is not inclined to walk after the buses retire for the night, there are countless taxis as well. I am independent from these forms of transportation, as I have my own bicycle, and Hantai District is small enough to be crossed on two wheels. Living south of the river, I am close to the countryside, and can easily go for rides out into the green valleys and hills.

Hanzhong has a long history, dating back to times before 220 BC. During the time of the Three Kingdoms (220-280 AD) Hanzhong was an important location for military strategy, and the Han Dynasty is named after the area. Despite the many years of settlement in the Hanzhong Basin, not many ancient structures, with a few exceptions, remain.

Hantai District satisfies shoppers’ every need with one shopping mall adjoining the next. My heart is made happy by the countless cafes that can be found throughout the city, and I often sit in one to do research for this blog and write new posts. Wherever you look restaurants, ranging from little hole in the walls to five star hotel food temples, can be found, which offer all the local delicacies, as well as international foods. Trees line next to every street here, and several well-kept parks can be found as well. Overall it is very clean here, and public and private places seem generally well maintained.

At the moment I could not imagine a better place to live in! Hanzhong is big enough to host all necessary facilities, and small enough to not be too crowded. Having lived in the mega-city of Cairo for the last four years, Hanzhong’s small town life is quite a welcome change.

After last week’s post on my job, and today’s on my city, I will write about the locals’ and my leisure time activities next week.


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Photography: Xi’an

Pictures taken in and around Xi’an’s Muslim Quarter

 


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Breakthrough

أُولَـٰئِكَ عَلَىٰ هُدًى مِّن رَّبِّهِمْ ۖ وَأُولَـٰئِكَ هُمُ الْمُفْلِحُونَ

THOSE ARE UPON [RIGHT] GUIDANCE FROM THEIR LORD, AND IT IS THOSE WHO ARE THE SUCCESSFUL. [Al-Baqarah 2:5]

On March 17, 2017, I, Cairene, finally got on a plane from Cairo to Guangzhou. The days before I received my visa, I had been busy with checking flight schedules and prices. After some digging, I eventually found the perfect connection: a direct, red eye flight from Egypt to China on Friday, a hotel for the night near Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport, and an onward flight to Xi’an on Saturday morning. I could have found cheaper options, but they would have been less convenient, as not only would they have been very exhausting due to several long transits, but also would not have allowed as much luggage as Egyptair does – 46 kg plus carry-on.

As I had reserved an emergency aisle window seat, I had all the legroom I could wish for, and was able to get about 5 hours of sleep above the clouds. This amount was enough to get me through Friday afternoon and evening, and ensured that I could go to bed in a timely manner in the evening. I spent the remaining flight time eating and watching the Academy Award winning musical “La La Land”. Despite the high praise from critics and success with the audience, I found the movie a little boring, and the music average; I think there are much better musicals out there, “Dancer in the Dark” is one example.

Once I reached Guangzhou, it was time for immigration, baggage claim, and customs. As Guangzhou is quite a busy airport with many flights arriving simultaneously, the waiting time to go through immigration was about an hour; reading Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies helped pass the time. The immigration officer was friendly and quick, something you don’t find at every border, and there was no further wait for luggage or customs. Make sure to have a pen ready to fill out the arrival form.

I then proceeded to the hotel information desk in order to find out about where to board the free hotel shuttle. The nice lady behind the counter told me where to find it and I followed her directions, only to find out that her directions didn’t make any sense. The next person I asked was from the bus ticket office, and her directions – different ones – weren’t helpful either. Fed up with being misdirected, I figured I could just as well take a taxi for the short distance. The nice driver helped me with my luggage and asked me whereto I was headed. In response I showed him the address on my phone and asked him to call the hotel for directions. They connected us to an English speaking lady who told me to get out of the car and wait for a few minutes where I was, a driver from the hotel would come and pick me up. The taxi driver unloaded my bags, we said goodbye, and a very short time later I was picked up by the shuttle. I would like to note that the taxi driver did not ask for any money for his help – in Egypt the same situation would have required some baksheesh.

Another thing I would like to mention is that the hotel I originally booked for the night is one that only accepts Chinese guests, not foreigners; a fact I wasn’t aware of at the time of booking. Nonetheless, they arranged a room at another hotel for me that would accept foreign nationals, albeit at a somewhat higher price, but with great service. (I’m speaking of a price difference of roughly 15 Euros, so no big deal.) The hotel provided the airport shuttle both ways, a wakeup call, and a private ensuite room; all in all it cost around 25 Euros and proved to be more convenient and only slightly more expensive than spending the night at the airport on a bench, eating expensive food, and paying for a shower and luggage storage over night. After a long, hot shower I was quite refreshed, and got a good night’s sleep. The time difference between China and Egypt is six hours, and I was easily able to adapt to the difference.

On Saturday morning the hotel staff woke me up, I packed my bags once more, and was taken to the airport. All went well and I boarded the plane, a Hainan Airways flight to Xi’an. Rarely have I been on such a turbulent flight! There must have been strong winds above the clouds, as we were shaken about half the time. Regardless, the plane was comfortable with enough legroom, and the staff professional and courteous. The pre-departure flight safety video was more interesting than that of many other airlines, as it showed the beautiful Hainan beaches, and emphasized protecting the environment. On arrival there was no wait for the luggage, and I proceeded to the exit, where I was to be picked up by Rita from Buckland.

I was in for a surprise!