Ice Cream and Zombies

Do you remember the first time that you ate ice-cream as a child? Or the first time you jumped into the sea?

First time experiences are very nice, but also become rarer and rarer as we grow up.This is why traveling is loved by so many people: All these new first times!

First time to fly to China, first time to eat something new, first time to do, see, hear or breathe all these new things!

Oh, and the first ever flight delay in China!

Imagine this: you have been traveling for countless hours and as a result you are pretty much a zombie, you have reached an airport that you visit for the first time, only to discover that your mobile line – which was supposed to work internationally and had previously worked internationally – is not working, the free wifi of the airport needs – of course – a working mobile line to give you an access code to the wifi network, you have tried to make a call from an airport land line and failed miserably, and your connecting flight to Xi’an is delayed over and over again.

I need to contact Cairene to let her know about the delay. You see: I will reach Xi’an airport late, buses might not be available anymore, so Cairene arranged a driver to wait for me. But since I got delayed so many times, I have no idea if the driver will be waiting or not, no idea of anything else, really, because – basically – I am off grid.

So, I wait, and wait, and wait, take videos, make funny faces at some Chinese toddler, take a video of myself and the situation – just in case they found it later with my belongings and my skeleton in abandoned corner in the airport many years from now – and then wait some more, until eventually – right before my feet get stuck forever to the floor of the airport – the line starts to move, and I find myself sitting in another airplane full of Chinese people flying to Xi’an.

2 hours and 2 coffees later, I find myself in Xi’an airport, with Carine at the exit door with a big smile on her face.(I secretly cried tears of happiness on the inside. Shhh, no one tell her that! I will not become a broke, homeless foreigner, living in front of the exit door of Xi’an airport! Yay!)

And this is how I reached Xi’an city, where Carine and I were to spend the next few days walking around the city, fighting the endless rain and finishing the health check papers.

written by Rora


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Photography: Hanzhong

What follows are some random shots from Hanzhong’s Hantai District and Nanzheng County that I have taken between March and May.

Settling: City

China, also known as the People’s Republic of China, consists of 31 provincial-level devisions, among them the province of Shaanxi. While Shaanxi is commonly regarded as a Northwestern province, it is located more or less exactly in China’s center. And if I had to name China’s most central city, I would name Hanzhong 汉中, which translates to “middle of the Han River”.

Hanzhong has been my home for a bit over two months now, and I very much enjoy living here, as the quality of life is high, the air, compared to many other Chinese cities, very clean, the city very green, and the food great! Hanzhong is located in a basin, surrounded on all sides by mountain ranges: the Daba Mountains in the south, and the Qin Mountains in the north. The Han River and several tributaries flow through Hanzhong, which offer splendid opportunities for walks and bike rides along the river banks.

To be exact, Hanzhong is a prefecture-level city, which is further divided into ten counties and one district. As I live south of the Han River, I live in Nanzheng County, and the more densely populated urban area north of the river is called Hantai District. Wherever you look, Hanzhong is rapidly modernizing, and high rise apartment buildings are shooting from the ground like the mushrooms in Sylvia Plath’s poetic forest floor. Some older living quarters can still be found throughout the city, but I am sure they, too, will soon be flattened to make space for modern apartments.

At the moment Hanzhong can be reached by long-distance buses, slow trains, and a few air links. Traveling to Shaanxi’s provincial capital, Xi’an, currently takes around four hours by bus – a very scenic route as long as one is in the basin; once one reaches the mountains one tunnel follows the next. I have, however, heard talk about a high-speed rail connection, said to commence operations in autumn, which will connect Hanzhong with the rest of the country.

To get from one part of the city to another countless city buses operate all day – though I must say that 8:30 pm is really not a good time to finish operations. If one is not inclined to walk after the buses retire for the night, there are countless taxis as well. I am independent from these forms of transportation, as I have my own bicycle, and Hantai District is small enough to be crossed on two wheels. Living south of the river, I am close to the countryside, and can easily go for rides out into the green valleys and hills.

Hanzhong has a long history, dating back to times before 220 BC. During the time of the Three Kingdoms (220-280 AD) Hanzhong was an important location for military strategy, and the Han Dynasty is named after the area. Despite the many years of settlement in the Hanzhong Basin, not many ancient structures, with a few exceptions, remain.

Hantai District satisfies shoppers’ every need with one shopping mall adjoining the next. My heart is made happy by the countless cafes that can be found throughout the city, and I often sit in one to do research for this blog and write new posts. Wherever you look restaurants, ranging from little hole in the walls to five star hotel food temples, can be found, which offer all the local delicacies, as well as international foods. Trees line next to every street here, and several well-kept parks can be found as well. Overall it is very clean here, and public and private places seem generally well maintained.

At the moment I could not imagine a better place to live in! Hanzhong is big enough to host all necessary facilities, and small enough to not be too crowded. Having lived in the mega-city of Cairo for the last four years, Hanzhong’s small town life is quite a welcome change.

After last week’s post on my job, and today’s on my city, I will write about the locals’ and my leisure time activities next week.


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